“We want a country and we will have it.” According to Pauline Marois, the newly elected prime minister of Québéc, Canada, there is no doubt that she will lead the French-speaking region to independency. But how realistic is that? It is clear that some substantial obstacles have to be overcome before the Québécois flag can be risen.

Separatist and nationalist feelings were widely felt during Marois’ victory speech on the 4th of September – and they were not all as peaceful as the singing of the anthem ‘Gens du Pays’ by the crowd. One man was shot dead right next to Montreal’s Metropolis where Marois was holding her speech. The perpetrator was an assumingly English-speaking man shouting “the English are waking up!” in French. Another person was heavily wounded and Marois herself was quickly rushed from the stage by security personnel. It is a sad impression of the divided and harsh political climate, in which nevertheless one important factor makes it very unlikely that this first female Premier of Québec will succeed in her independency mission.

The indispensable unity among the Québec people has not yet been found.

#1: Pauline Marois’s Parti Québécois has a minority in the Québéc government.

The PQ has gained only 54 of the 126 seats in parliament. In order to organize a referendum necessary to call independence, it needs the support of other parties. Since the second biggest party is that of the Liberals (50 seats) that state  that “the future of Quebec lies within Canada,” it is unlikely that this support will be given. Let alone that there will be a majority among the public in the rare case a referendum is actually held. The indispensable unity among the Québec people has not yet been found.

The We that want a country are not strong enough. The We that will have a country are probably going to have some sweet separatist dreams during a long lasting night.

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