Breaking News
Home / Politics (page 5)

Politics

Britain and the EU: An Unavoidable Referendum

David Cameron has pledged to renegotiate Britain’s relationship with the European Union before holding a referendum on the country’s membership by the end of 2017. This in/out referendum on Britain’s membership has for years been craved, derided, and resolutely ignored in more or less equal measure by the various elements of Britain’s political establishment. For some in Britain, a referendum on ... Read More »

It Is the Small State that Is Concerned About the Effectiveness of the International Laws the Most

When in 1569 the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was created, Lithuania ceased to exist. It was only visible on maps mostly as part of Poland and since 1795 as a part of the Russian Empire. Starting from 1918, Lithuania experienced 22 years of independence until it was occupied by the Soviets in 1940. Notwithstanding, the country managed to prevail, to maintain its language ... Read More »

The Greeks, the Pope, and the Euro’s Soul

What do the Pope’s visit to South America and the almost TV-series-worthy developments in Greece have in common? Even though the Pope claims to have no political intentions, with his passionate critique of economic injustice and environmental degradation, he would make a formidable politician. Visiting Bolivia, Ecuador and Paraguay, he is set to address the incredibly sore and widespread income ... Read More »

NATO – Defensive or Offensive?

NATO’s Military Buildup Near the Russian Border By Alexandra Voinescu The European Phased Adaptive Approach (EPAA) operation is incorporated in the North Atlantic Council’s agenda. The EPAA constitutes of Ballistic Missile Defenses (BMD) located in Poland and Romania. NATO justified the Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) deployment, constructed with US technology, in Romania and Poland as a defensive measure to counter Iran’s nuclear program. ... Read More »

Sanctions vs. Sanctions: Poking the Bear?

Poke a bear and he pokes you back. Putin raises his shoulders about Russia’s renewed sanctions against the West: “The government turned to me with an appeal,” he claims. Well okay, let’s not blame Putin for this one then. Wednesday’s announcement of the extension of Russia’s ban against most food imports from the US, EU, Australia, Canada and Norway came ... Read More »

Students Engage with Diplomacy

On 30th April 2015, Clio welcomed a number of diplomatic guests, professors and 150 university students to Het Kasteel for the annual Clio Conference, this year entitled Diplomacy Unravelled: Power and Prudence in a New Era. Many students of International Relations have a strong interest in diplomacy but few know its inner workings, and although frequently alluded to on the ... Read More »

On Banks, Occupation, and Building a Better Tomorrow…

Before the 1970s, banks were just that – banks. They did what banks were supposed to do in a capitalist state economy. What that is? They took unused funds from your bank account, and transferred them to some potentially useful purpose like helping someone to buy a home or send a kid to college, whatever the funds might be needed for. ... Read More »

Interview with Jean-Pierre Kempeneers

Picture by Nacho Facello

On the 30th of April Clio will host its annual conference under the theme “Diplomacy unravelled?”. At this conference, Jean-Pierre Kempeneers will lead a workshop on the importance of economic diplomacy. Mr Kempeneers has been serving in the Dutch diplomatic service for almost two decades. In 2014 he changed into the private sector and started working as Head of the ... Read More »

A Tribute to Lee Kuan Yew

On the 23rd of March this year, Asia lost one of its most peculiar leaders: Lee Kuan Yew, the very first prime minister of Singapore. This man, who was known for his seemingly totalitarian regime was nevertheless a dearly beloved and admired leader among his citizens. Through Western eyes it seems a strange paradox to have a population bound by ... Read More »

Why Tröglitz matters

On the eve of Easter Sunday a house went up in flames in the small village of Tröglitz in East Germany; the result of an arson attack. The building was supposed to accommodate 40 refugees from May onwards. This particular incident is illustrative for a change in German politics. Its implications might ultimately be felt in all of Europe. The ... Read More »