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Tag Archives: education

Hans Rosling – The fundamental hole in media coverage

Hans Rosling died at the age of 68 on 7 January 2017. As a person striving for a better educated population, more optimism and a more accurate understanding of our world, he left a hole in the global community. As an homage to his work, we wrote an article on the value of his optimism… He waves with great enthusiasm ... Read More »

The Jante Law

In my previous article ‘Entering the Field of International Relations,’ I investigated the ways through which an International Relations graduate can find a job more effectively. The principle message was to outstand yourself from the crowd by engaging in as many extra-curriculum activities as possible, while simultaneously building your own network. Yet, in other circumstances, this might be counterproductive. When I ... Read More »

Entering the Field of International Relations

In the business of IR it is partly what you know and mainly whom you know… The study of international relations (IR) is a theoretical one. The obligatory courses revolve around systems of ideas, concepts and principles on which the practice of politics is based. While analyzing the contemporary global affairs through the prisms of differing schools of thought, us, ... Read More »

Exchange in Stellenbosch: Feeling Alive!

As the exams are drawing to a close, and more and more students are leaving this little town for greener (and considerably warmer) pastures, Stellenbosch surely is a different place than it was a mere month ago. At the moment, I’m snuggling up in my bed with a cup of hot chocolate, because the rain has been pouring down for ... Read More »

Fighting Misinformation: Google vs. The Internet

The internet is full of garbage, you know it, I know it, let’s not kid ourselves. Anti-vaccination websites get to the first page of Google and factual inaccurate “news” stories spread like wildfire, while pictures of “Blue and Gold Dresses” dominate Facebook and fast-track news websites. In a world where most of our information is gathered on the internet, misinformation ... Read More »

A Voice for Tolerance, a Voice for Hope

Northern Syria is surely not a place that produces much good news at the moment. The Syrian civil war is in its fourth year, the advance of the Islamic State has shown to the world what atrocities Syrians have to face and the desperate struggle for Kobani is still not decided. And yet one can find stories of cooperation, tolerance ... Read More »

The Market Dynamics of University

The way we gain our academic knowledge is changing. We are no longer students, but consumers. Universities are no longer arenas of knowledge sharing and transferral, but profit-seeking suppliers. The goal of enrolling oneself in university has shifted from self-refinement to being sketched against a cost-benefit analysis of financial input and resume accreditation. This change is explainable, perhaps unavoidable even, ... Read More »

The Canons of Journalism: Presenting the ‘Truth’ or Violating the Ethical Norms?

Providing explicit frameworks of explanation, as well tacit understandings based on associations of ideas, evoking images, shaping the natural chains of thought – these are the principal characteristics of the mass media. The preservation of democratic values and commitment to fairness, however, are slowly vanishing from our comprehension about journalism. The cause of this phenomenon can be referred to the ... Read More »

A Spiritual Guidance of the Nation

In a country far, far away there once was a dictator that controlled an entire nation. He was in charge of all three branches of government, plus the economy and the media. Everybody had to do as he pleased. He was the richest man of the country. But the dictator was not satisfied, he wanted more. And so the dictator ... Read More »

The Wonchi Experiment – Can Tablets be Teachers?

In Ethiopia over 2,000,000 children of school age do not go to school. Most of them never will. A few of them have tablets – and miraculously taught themselves how to read and write. MIT professor and technology nerd Nicholas Negroponte wanted to see what would happen if you handed a tablet computer, equipped with educational apps, to a group ... Read More »